Question: How accurate are LH ovulation tests?

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How long after a positive LH test do you ovulate?

The LH surge triggers ovulation, which is the start of a woman’s fertile period. When an ovulation test result is positive, it means that LH levels are high, and ovulation should occur within the next 24 to 36 hours.

Does high LH mean you’re ovulating?

When the body’s levels of luteinizing hormone (LH) rise, it triggers the start of ovulation, and the most fertile period of the menstrual cycle occurs. Tracking the surge in luteinizing hormone levels can help people to plan intercourse and increase the chances of becoming pregnant.

How accurate are LH ovulation tests?

LH is always present, but it surges just before a woman’s mature egg passes through the wall of her ovary and makes its way down the fallopian tube to meet up with any eligible spermatozoa that happen to be around. When used correctly, LH tests are around 99% accurate, says Dr.

Can you ovulate the same day as LH surge?

The LH surge indicates ovulation will occur at some point within the next twelve to forty-eight hours (on average). The window is large because it is different for everyone. Some people ovulate the same day as the LH surge and some ovulate two days after the surge.

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Can I get pregnant 2 days after positive ovulation test?

The short answer: not long. Eggs are only viable for about 24 hours after they’re released. That, combined with the 36 hours between a positive ovulation test and ovulation, means you may only have about 60 hours (or 2 ½ days) during your cycle when conception is even possible.

What time of day is best to take ovulation test?

The best time to take an ovulation test is with the second morning urine – roughly between 10 am and noon. The ovulation predictor test looks for a hormone called LH or luteinizing hormone in your urine.

What is a good LH level to get pregnant?

women in the luteal phase of the menstrual cycle: 0.5 to 16.9 IU/L. pregnant women: less than 1.5 IU/L. women past menopause: 15.9 to 54.0 IU/L. women using contraceptives: 0.7 to 5.6 IU/L.