Quick Answer: Should a 2 month old make eye contact?

Why does my 2 month old not look at me?

It takes your baby’s eyes some time to adjust to the world, so at first they might not always look or function the way you expect. For example, it’s perfectly normal in the first three months of life for your infant’s eyes to be crossed, or for him not to be able to see much past your face when you’re holding him.

What does it mean when a baby doesn’t make eye contact?

Researchers focused on babies’ ability to make eye contact with caregivers, since lack of eye contact is one of the hallmarks of autism. Among typical children, interest in the eyes increased steadily with age. But for children with autism, interest in the eyes waned starting between 2 and 6 months of age.

When should I worry about my baby not making eye contact?

As per the growth milestones set by pediatricians, most babies start to make eye contact at around three months of age. If an infant fails to make eye contact in the first six months, an immediate consultation with an expert is recommended.

How can I help my baby make eye contact?

You can use play to help your child increase eye contact, and there are countless ways to do so. With young children, use peek-a-boo to practice getting and giving eye contact. Use a smile, tickle, laugh, hug, squeeze, make funny faces, make funny sounds, or whatever your child likes, to reinforce when your eyes meet.

IT IS INTERESTING:  Question: Why is it bad to rock baby to sleep?

Is eye contact important for babies?

The early nonverbal forms of communication—eye contact and joint attention—are vitally important for laying a solid foundation for language to develop. Eye contact is an early predictor of language skills. First, an infant develops the ability to focus his eyes on a face.