Best answer: What nutrients pass through breast milk?

What vitamins and minerals pass through breast milk?

Fat-soluble vitamins such as A, D, E and K are crucial to your baby’s health. Water-soluble vitamins such as vitamin C, riboflavin, niacin and pantothenic acid are also essential.

Do vitamins get passed through breast milk?

Vitamins vary in their ability to transfer into breastmilk. Fat soluble vitamins, such as vitamin D and E, easily transfer into breastmilk and reliably increase their levels. Water soluble vitamins, such as B and C are more variable in their transmission into breastmilk.

What nutrients pass through breast milk?

These nutrients include:

  • Free water.
  • Proteins – Protein accounts for 75% of the nitrogen-containing compounds and the non-protein nitrogen substances include urea, nucleotides, peptides, free amino acids and DNA.
  • Fats – Essential fatty acids and long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acids.

What vitamins are not in breast milk?

And while breast milk is the ideal food for newborns, it doesn’t contain enough of two crucial nutrients: vitamin D and iron. While iron is necessary for healthy blood cells and brain development, babies also need the mineral to prevent iron deficiency (a problem for many little kids) and iron deficiency anemia.

Does Vitamin C go into breast milk?

Summary of Use during Lactation

Vitamin C is a normal component of human milk and is a key milk antioxidant. The recommended vitamin C intake in lactating women is 120 mg daily, and for infants aged 6 months or less is 40 mg daily.

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Does baby get B12 from breast milk?

Vitamin B12 is transferred through the placenta to the fetus during pregnancy and through breast milk after birth. Infants who drink breast milk from a mother who consumes adequate amounts of vitamin B12 or infants who drink infant formula, will receive enough vitamin B12.

Does breast milk lose nutritional value?

Breast milk is considered the gold standard for infant nutrition. There’s no known age at which breast milk is considered to become nutritionally insignificant for a child.