When should I move to Stage 2 baby food?

What is the difference between stage1 and Stage 2 baby food?

Texture: Stage 1 baby foods are very smoothly pureed and are soupy enough to drip off of a spoon, while Stage 2 foods may be roughly pureed, blended or strained. They maintain a thicker, denser consistency and may include small chunks for your baby to gum around in their mouth.

How do you transition from Stage 1 to Stage 2 formula?

It’s best to introduce the new formula or milk gradually by mixing it with the old formula. You can consider following a transition schedule like this: Day 1 & 2: 25% new formula or milk; 75% old formula. Day 3 & 4: 50% new formula or milk; 50% old formula.

Can I give my 5 month old Stage 2 formula?

Cow’s milk-based baby formulas for babies up to six months of age are called stage 1 or starter formulas. You can use stage 1 formulas up until your baby is 12 months old. From six months, you can choose stage 2 or follow-on formula, but you don’t need to change to stage 2.

What are stage 2 foods?

Stage 2 essentially means the food has a thicker consistency, resembling just a bit more the “regular food” that adults and older children eat. It is still pureed or finely blended, though, so it is still easy for babies to eat and digest, but also contains soft chunks or is simply thicker.

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What age is Gerber 1st Foods?

When to Start Feeding Baby Stage 3 Gerber Foods

Baby cereal is usually introduced between the ages of 4 and 6 months. After a couple of weeks or a month, when baby becomes more comfortable eating from a spoon and seems adept at eating the cereal, it is time to start introducing the Stage 1 foods.

Can I give my 3 month old baby food?

Wait until your baby is at least 4 months old and shows these signs of readiness before starting solids. Babies who start solid foods before 4 months are at a higher risk for obesity and other problems later on.

What happens if you give a baby food too early?

Starting solids too early — before age 4 months — might: Pose a risk of food being sucked into the airway (aspiration) Cause a baby to get too many or not enough calories or nutrients. Increase a baby’s risk of obesity.